Top 20 Perennial Flowering Vines For Shade | The Ultimate Guide

Sitting in the shade on a warm summer day with a glass of iced water, listening to the gentle breeze rustling through the leaves, and feeling the scent of colorful flowers filling the air. Sounds enchanting, no? You can experience it too! How, may you ask?

Well, it is pretty straightforward. Just plant some perennial flowering vines.

flowering vines for shade

Photo Credit Planting a flowering vine for shade is a fantastic way to add colors to your home.

Vines are delicate plants that cannot support their weight. They hold onto other plants with tendrils or wrap their stems around any other nearby structures.

Some of these flowering vines are excellent for creating shady spots in the backyard or any other sunny part of your home that could use some color. There are many options, and no matter where you live, you can find many flowering vines that quickly grow to provide shade and act as natural privacy screens. Examples include Chinese Wisteria, Honeysuckle, American Groundnut, and Sausage Vine.

These climbers make bold statements while using minimal ground space. So, let’s look at a few well-known flowering vines and learn how to care for them.

Consider This When Choosing A Vine

Consider This When Choosing A Vine

Photo Credit The selection of a suitable vine depends on its soil adaptability, intended use, location, and type of support.

Planting a flowering vine for shade in your garden is an attractive addition to the landscape. Furthermore, it can help hide an otherwise unsightly fence or any other object you want to cover. However, when planting vines, you must consider a few things.

Vines Are Vigorous Growers

Vines and other climbers often used in homes to provide shade are active growers. In perfect conditions, some vines can become overly aggressive. Some can even damage the wooden or brick structures and create long-term ‘living siding.’ Furthermore, please take care and do not pick a flowering vine that is invasive to your region.

Some Vines Might Need Some Training

Vines are natural climbers. In the wild, vines often grow on tree trunks, especially in tropical forests. However, in concrete homes nowadays, some vines might need help climbing vertically and providing even coverage. For example, some vines must have a trellis or support to climb. Otherwise, they’ll trail along the ground and grow that way.

Vines Have Varying Sunlight Preference

When growing vines, ensure that your vine gets all the sunlight or shade it needs. Quite a few vines can grow in partial shade. For example, if your main goal isn’t fruit, the grapevine only needs about two to three hours of sunlight daily.

Be Clear What You Want

When looking at your options, research and consider what you want. For example, you can plant sausage vines if you only want to cover a brick wall or an ugly fence. They are hardy growers and can reach heights up to 12 to 18 feet.

However, if you want some color, too, you might want to plant Vinca Minor.

RELATED: Calming And Candid: 9 Different Types Of Clematises

Best Flowering Vines For Shade

Many flowering vines exist across various United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) hardiness zones. No matter where you live, you will always have a few options. So, let’s take a quick look at some of them and discuss how to care for them properly.

1. Honeysuckle (Lonicera caprifolium)

Honeysuckle

Photo Credit Honeysuckle is a favorite plant because it is heat tolerant and can thrive in extreme weather.

Overview

Filling the air with its intoxicating sweet scent, twining with abandon around archways and arbors, Honeysuckle is arguably the queen of flowering vines. Honeysuckle is arguably the queen of flowering vines. It attracts lots of wildlife and is heat-tolerant, which means it can create a perfect cover to stop and hide from the scorching summer sun.

Honeysuckle Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginEurope, Western Asia
USDA Hardiness Zone4 to 8
Plant Height10 to 20 feet (3 to 6 meters)
Plant Width6 to 12 feet (1.8 to 3.7 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorPink, red, or yellow tubular flowers with a sweet fragrance
Foliage ColorDark green leaves with a bluish hue and opposite arrangement on stems
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, moist and fertile
Invasive RegionsNorth America, New Zealand, and parts of Australia

Where To Buy?

Honeysuckle Vine Plant, Rooted Vines – Etsy

2. Climbing Hydrangea (Hydrangea anomala)

Climbing Hydrangea

Photo Credit Climbing hydrangea is one of the few hardy flowering vines that are great for shade.

Overview

Looking across a sunny yard with hydrangea vine in full bloom is a site to behold. Though a slow grower, Climbing Hydrangea is a robust climber that can brighten up dull house walls and cover outbuildings. It provides all the beauty of a traditional hydrangea bush but in a trailing and climbing variety. And, since it is self-clinging, it requires no support. 

Climbing Hydrangea Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginAsia, specifically China and the Himalayas
USDA Hardiness Zone4 to 8
Plant Height30 to 80 feet (9 to 24 meters)
Plant Width5 to 6 feet (1.5 to 1.8 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorWhite, fragrant, lace-cap flowers in flat clusters
Foliage ColorDark green leaves with a heart-shaped base and pointed tips
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, moist and fertile, pH range of 5.5 to 7.5
Invasive RegionsClimbing Hydrangea is not considered invasive

Where To Buy?

20 Seeds Climbing Hydrangea – Etsy

3. Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

Boston Ivy

Photo Credit Boston ivy is a fast-growing tendril-type vine that grows well in full sun or shade.

Overview:

Boston ivy is a fabulous, lush, clambering foliage plant. It is often used to dress large, old buildings and houses. And did you know Boston Ivy is the same plant that gives Ivy League universities their nickname? Boston ivy is all you need if you are looking for a visually spectacular, hardy plant that can survive shade and sun and is adept at sticking to surfaces.

Boston Ivy Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginEastern Asia, specifically Japan, and China
USDA Hardiness Zone4 to 8
Plant HeightUp to 50 feet (15 meters)
Plant WidthUp to 50 feet (15 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorInsignificant small greenish-white flowers in clusters
Foliage ColorGreen in the summer, turning red or purple in the fall
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, adaptable to a wide range of soil types
Invasive RegionsMichigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and many others.

Where To Buy?

Boston Ivy/Japanese Creeper – Etsy

4. Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)

Virginia Creeper

Photo Credit The Virginia creeper is similar to a Boston ivy. But, it loses its leaves over winter.

Overview

Virginia creeper vines are good climbers, with big leaves that can provide shade and keep houses cool on hot summer days. It is often used for ground cover or a climbing vine on stone walls and trellises. Furthermore, growing a Virginia creeper vine provides a nearly carefree addition to the landscape. It is often a component of woodland gardens – either naturally dispersed by animals or planted by people.

Virginia Creeper Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginEastern and Central North America
USDA Hardiness Zone3 to 9
Plant HeightUp to 40 feet (12 meters)
Plant WidthUp to 30 feet (9 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to full shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorSmall greenish-white flowers in clusters
Foliage ColorGreen in the summer, turning brilliant red in the fall
Soil RequirementsAdaptable to a wide range of soil types but prefers well-draining soil
Invasive RegionsOregon, Washington, Montana, and many others.

Where to Buy?

Virginia Creeper Seeds – Fresh Seeds – Parthenocissus quinquefolia – Etsy

5. Clematis (Genus Clematis)

Clematis

Photo Credit Clematis are among the most decorative and spectacular flowering vines.

Overview

Once you have seen a clematis in full bloom, you will know why this flowering vine is called the Queen of Climbers. However, please remember that some clematis species bloom in spring, others in mid-to-late summer. Nevertheless, these plants dress up any structure, and you can use them as shade coverings or natural privacy screens. 

Clematis Quick Facts

Information  Description
Geographic Origin,Native to most continents except Antarctica
USDA Zones,Varies depending on the species3 to 11
Plant Height1 to 30 feet (0.3 to 9 meters)
Plant Width1 to 20 feet (0.3 to 6 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonEarly spring to late fall
Flower ColorWhite, pink, red, purple, blue, and yellow
Foliage ColorLight to dark green
Soil Requirements  Well-drained soil with medium to high moisture levels
Invasive?Some species are invasive.

Where to Buy?

100 PCS Blue Clematis Seeds Creeping Plants – Etsy

RELATED: 5 Types Of Wisteria Plants & How To Select The Right Kind For Your Garden? (With Pictures)

6. Trumpet Vine (Campsis Radicans)

Trumpet Vine

Photo Credit The trumpet vine is a flowering plant that attracts hummingbirds.

Overview

Trumpet vine, or trumpet creeper, is a fast-growing perennial vine. It has emerald green leaves that create a backdrop for its tubular flowers in shades of pink, orange, red, and yellow. Trumpet vine can extend as much as 40 feet when mature. 

If conditions are right, the woody perennial vine can take over a yard in a single season. So, please keep it in check if you plant it.

Trumpet Vine Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginEastern and Central North America
USDA Hardiness Zone3 to 9
Plant HeightUp to 40 feet (12 meters)
Plant WidthUp to 30 feet (9 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to full shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorSmall greenish-white flowers in clusters
Foliage ColorGreen in the summer, turning brilliant red in the fall
Soil RequirementsAdaptable to a wide range of soil types but prefers well-draining soil
Invasive RegionsParts of Texas, Florida, and California.

Where To Buy?

Trumpet vine, trumpet creeper, 0.3 g Organic Seeds – Etsy

7. American Groundnut (Apios americana)

American Groundnut

Photo Credit Unlike what many think, American groundnuts (Apios americana) are not a form of peanuts.

Overview

If you’re up for an adventure, you may want to consider growing American groundnuts. It has edible fruits and large edible tubers that provide numerous health benefits. However, that is not why you are here. You want to know whether you can use it as a shade vine. It has long, leafy vines that can grow to ten feet high. So, yes! You can use it as a shade vine.

American Groundnut Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNorth America
USDA Hardiness Zone3 to 9
Plant HeightUp to 10 feet
Plant Width3 to 6 feet
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonSummer to early fall
Flower ColorDark purple-brown
Foliage ColorDark green
Soil RequirementsMoist, well-drained soil
Invasive RegionsNone

Where To Buy?

American Groundnut Apios americana 10 Seeds – Etsy

8. Hops (Humulus lupulus)

Hops

Photo Credit Did you know that historically, hop flowers were used as a sedative and in elixirs?

Overview

Hops vine is for you if you want to plant a vine for shade but also want to gain a little extra on the side. Hops – the cone-like fruits that give most brews their signature flavors and aromas. Furthermore, their foliage smells delightful, and plants amass piles and shade-drenched leaves. The hop plant produces best under specific climatic and soil conditions. Read the table below to find out more about it.

Hops Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to Europe and Western Asia, but now grown worldwide
USDA Hardiness Zone3 to 8
Plant Height25 feet (7.6 meters)
Plant Width6 feet (1.8 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate summer to early fall
Flower ColorPale greenish-yellow
Foliage ColorBright green, turning yellow in the fall
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil with pH between 6.0 and 8.0, high in nutrients
Invasive RegionsNone known, but can be aggressive in certain growing conditions

Where To Buy?

2022 Hops – Organic Cascade Whole Leaf Hops – Etsy

9. Wild Potato Vine (Ipomoea pandurate)

Wild Potato Vine

Photo Credit The wild potato vine is showy, with larger heart-shaped leaves, purple stems, and white flowers.

Overview

Wild potato vine is quickly grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils. It is not only a fantastic choice for shade gardens, but it has tubers that can be used as food. Furthermore, Its leaves are heart-shaped and look similar to other morning glories. 

When in bloom, it produces white flowers with purple necks. Nevertheless, if you decide to plant this vine in your garden, here is some information you might need.

Wild Potato Vine Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to North America, including the eastern and central US
USDA Hardiness Zone5 to 10
Plant HeightUp to 10 feet (3 meters)
Plant WidthSpreads up to 6 feet (1.8 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonSummer to early fall
Flower ColorWhite or pink, trumpet-shaped
Foliage ColorDeep green
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil with a pH between 5.5 and 7.0
Invasive RegionsNone known.

Where To Buy?

Ipomoea pandurate – Etsy

10. Sweet Pea (Lathyrus odoratus)

Sweet Pea

Photo Credit The blooms of only a few vines have the lasting appeal and rustic beauty of sweet peas.

Overview

The colorful and fragrant sweet pea is a favorite vine for informal cottage gardens and is easy to grow. Moreover, it comes in many colors, making it an irresistible choice for bouquets and arrangements. Ornamental sweet peas have been around for centuries, long enough to be considered old-fashioned. You can grow them in pots or on the ground. However, I recommend training them up a frame for a beautiful display.

Sweet Pea Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to Italy and the Aegean Islands, but widely grown today
USDA Hardiness Zone6 to 9
Plant Height6 feet (1.8 meters)
Plant Width3 feet (0.9 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorVarious colors, including pink, purple, white, and red
Foliage ColorGreen
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil with pH between 6.0 and 7.0
Invasive RegionsNone known

Where to Buy?

30 seeds- Sweet Pea ‘Matucana’ – Etsy

11. Chocolate Vine (Akebia quinata)

Chocolate Vine

Photo Credit Chocolate Vine (Akebia quinata) is a fast-growing, deciduous, twining vine or groundcover.

Overview

Semi-evergreen climber about 10m tall, with rounded dark green leaves, the chocolate vine can be used as a shade vine to add color and contrast to any landscape. It spreads fast, which makes an excellent cover for arbors, trellises, pergolas, or fences. Moreover, the chocolate vine flowers do not just look beautiful; they have a lovely scent too. 

Chocolate Vine Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to East Asia, but widely cultivated as an ornamental plant
USDA Hardiness Zone4 to 9
Plant TypeSemi-evergreen vine or ground cover
Plant HeightUp to 40 feet (12 meters)
Plant WidthUp to 10 feet (3 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorDark purple or maroon
Foliage ColorGreen
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil with a pH between 5.5 and 7.5
Invasive RegionsOregon, Washington, and Pennsylvania

Where To Buy?

Chocolate Vine Seeds ~ Akebia Quinata – Etsy

12. Star Jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides)

Star Jasmine

Photo Credit Star Jasmine is a versatile plant, perfect for growing up on a warm wall or a fence.

Overview

Jasmine plant care may require effort, but the results are well worth the work. And one of them is star jasmine. Star jasmine is a popular flowering vine in California and the southern United States. In spring and early summer, star jasmine will perfume an entire garden. It can also be planted directly in the ground and trained to climb or grow as bushes or ground cover. Or you can grow it in a pot or hanging basket from the top.

Star Jasmine Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginChina, Japan, Korea
USDA Hardiness Zone8 to 10
Plant TypeEvergreen vine
Plant Height6 to 25 feet
Plant Width3 to 6 feet
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to part shade
Blooming SeasonSpring to fall
Flower ColorWhite to pale pink
Foliage ColorDark green
Soil RequirementsWell-draining, fertile soil
Invasive RegionsSoutheastern United States

Where To Buy?

Star Jasmine; Trachelospermum Jasminoides – Etsy

13. Atlantic Pigeon Wing (Clitoria mariana)

Atlantic Pigeon Wing

Photo Credit Atlantic pigeon wings are vines with purple blooms resembling pigeon ears.

Overview

The delicate mouse-ear-looking plant will have you hearing the sounds of the sweet woodland areas. It is an excellent vine to plant if you want a short-growing vine or one as ground cover. These vines are in wide ornamental use and are typically grown on trellises or other plants. Several cultivars produce attractive flowers with plenty of garden appeal, and you can use all of them as a natural privacy screen around your home.

Atlantic Pigeon Wing Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to North America, found in the southeastern United States
USDA Hardiness Zone6 to 10
Plant Height1 to 3 feet (0.3 to 0.9 meters)
Plant Width2 to 4 feet (0.6 to 1.2 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early fall
Flower ColorLight blue to lavender, pea-like flowers in clusters
Foliage ColorGreen leaves, compound with three leaflets
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, adaptable to different soil types
Invasive RegionsAtlantic Pigeon Wing is not considered invasive.

Where To Buy?

Clitoria mariana – Atlantic Pigeon Wing – Etsy

RELATED: 7 Wonderful Wisteria Flowers (Including Pictures)

14. Bleeding Heart Vine (Clerodendrum thomsoniae)

Bleeding Heart Vine

Photo Credit This comparatively fast-growing tropical vine is best known for its unique bloom structure.

Overview

You may be aware of hanging spring-flowering bleeding heart vines if you have a shady landscape. Also known as glory bowers, they are sub-tropical vines that wrap their tendrils around a trellis or other support. It is one of the best fast-growing vines for covering an arbor, frame, or pergola. The delicate beauty of the bleeding heart vine belies its fast-growth habit. If you want more information on it, read the table below.

Bleeding Heart Vine Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to tropical west Africa
USDA Hardiness Zone9 to 11
Plant Height6 to 10 feet (1.8 to 3 meters)
Plant Width3 to 6 feet (0.9 to 1.8 meters)
Sunlight NeedsPartial shade to full shade
Blooming SeasonBlooms intermittently throughout the year,
Flower ColorWhite or pinkish-white flowers with distinctive red or maroon markings
Foliage ColorDark green, glossy leaves with a heart-shaped base
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, moist and fertile, pH range of 5.5 to 7.5
Invasive RegionsBleeding Heart Vine is not considered invasive.

Where To Buy?

Bright Red Bleeding Heart Seeds ~ Flower ~ Seeds – Etsy

15. Carolina Jasmine (Gelsemium sempervivirens)

Carolina Jasmine

Photo Credit As warmer weather creeps in, so do the cheerful flowers of Carolina jessamine.

Overview

With stems exceeding 20 feet (6 m.), Carolina Jessamine can climb over anything it can twine its wiry stem around. It is one of my favorite vines for its cheerful color and heady perfume. It covers fences and trees in woodlands and along roadsides in the Southeast. Moreover, it is easy to care for; it is so easygoing you can even grow it in a container. 

Carolina Jasmine Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to the southeastern United States
USDA Hardiness Zone7 to 10
Plant HeightUp to 20 feet (6 meters) when supported.
Plant Width2 to 6 feet (0.6 to 1.8 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate winter to early spring
Flower ColorBright yellow with a sweet, jasmine-like fragrance
Foliage ColorDark green, glossy leaves that are evergreen
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, adaptable to different soil types
Invasive RegionsNot invasive. Still, it is an aggressive spreader.

Where To Buy?

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16. Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis)

Chinese Wisteria

Photo Credit There’s no mistaking the sweet fragrance of Chinese wisteria as it perfumes the garden.

Overview

Wisteria is a long-lived vine with downpours of stunning flowers that look spectacular hanging from a pergola or archway. It was introduced to the United States in the 1800s as an ornamental plant. Unfortunately, the vine has since become invasive, and it can take over and choke out plants in native landscapes. However, it still makes an excellent shade cover as long as you ensure it stays in the intended space and does not escape.

Chinese Wisteria Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to China
USDA Hardiness Zone5 to 8
Plant HeightUp to 100 feet (30 meters) 
Plant WidthUp to 30 feet (9 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorLavender to violet-blue
Foliage ColorDark green
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, moist and fertile, pH range of 6.0 to 7.0
Invasive RegionsSoutheastern United States

Where To Buy?

Wisteria sinensis Seeds, Chinese Wisteria – Etsy

17. Prairie Rose (Rosa setigera)

Prairie Rose

Photo Credit Prairie rose, called the “climbing rose,” is a vine in the Rosaceae (Rose) family member.

Overview

Prairie or Illinois rose, is a wide-spreading, native vine with arching stems. With support, the shrub can grow to a height of 15 feet and a width of 10 feet and be used as a natural privacy screen or shade cover. Furthermore, this stunning vine is not only lovely, but it also provides food and shelter for birds and other wildlife. Find more info below.

Prairie Rose Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to central and eastern United States
USDA Hardiness Zone4 to 9
Plant Height6 to 10 feet (1.8 to 3 meters)
Plant Width6 to 8 feet (1.8 to 2.4 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorPink or light rose, single or double flowers in clusters
Foliage ColorGreen leaves, compound with 5 to 7 leaflets
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, adaptable to different soil types
Invasive RegionsPrairie Rose is not considered invasive.

Where To Buy?

FALL PLANTING 5 Purple Rose Seeds, Rosa Setigera – Etsy

18. Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis paniculata)

Sweet Autumn Clematis

Photo Credit Sweet Autumn Clematis: Relish this fragrant climber but keep its aggressive nature in check.

Overview

The scented flowers on this lovely autumn vine are tiny and white, looking gorgeous when it covers a wood fence or a wall. Sweet autumn clematis is a flowering vine in the buttercup family. It is a lively grower that can quickly climb up an arbor, trellis, or tall support. However, despite its aggressive growth, pruning it once a year is usually all you need to keep it contained. Read the table below to learn more about this dense vine.

Sweet Autumn Clematis Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to Japan and China
USDA Hardiness Zone4 to 8
Plant HeightUp to 30 feet (9 meters)
Plant Width4 to 6 feet (1.2 to 1.8 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonLate summer to early fall
Flower ColorSmall, fragrant, white flowers in clusters
Foliage ColorDark green, glossy leaves, deciduous
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, moist and fertile, pH range of 6.0 to 7.0
Invasive RegionsSoutheastern United States

Where To Buy?

Sweet Autumn Clematis Seeds – Etsy

19. Sausage Vine (Holboellia coriacea)

Sausage Vine

Photo Credit Holboellia is not bold, but the scent of these climbers will transport you to another place.

Overview

Holboellia is a very surprising and slightly fragrant climbing vine. Sausage vine is often grown on trellises because it is a climbing vine, and it is popular with gardeners for its delightful scent. The plant produces scented pale pink flowers in spring or summer over palmate leaves. And you can use it to accent worn parts/walls of your home.

Sausage Vine Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to China and the Himalayas
USDA Hardiness Zone7 to 9
Plant HeightUp to 30 feet (9 meters)
Plant Width6 to 10 feet (1.8 to 3 meters)
Sunlight NeedsPartial shade to full shade
Blooming SeasonLate spring to early summer
Flower ColorGreenish-yellow, small, fragrant flowers in clusters
Foliage ColorDark green, glossy leaves, evergreen or semi-evergreen
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, moist and fertile, pH range of 6.0 to 7.0
Invasive RegionsSausage Vine is not considered invasive

Where To Buy?

Sausage Vine – 3 seeds for sowing – Etsy

20. Passion Flower (Passiflora caerulea)

Passion Flower

Photo Credit Passionflowers have numerous varieties, such as shrubs, annuals, perennials, and trees.

Overview

The vibrant colors and heady fragrance make the passion flower vine a welcome addition to any garden. However, choose carefully, as some passion flowers are suitable only for growing in a conservatory or greenhouse. Nevertheless, these vines are admired for their exotic-looking flowers produced freely during the summer. Lastly, passion flower vines ideally grow on walls, fences, and trellises around homes.

Passion Flower Quick Facts

InformationDescription
Geographic OriginNative to South America,
USDA Hardiness Zone7 to 11
Plant HeightUp to 30 feet (9 meters) 
Plant Width6 to 10 feet (1.8 to 3 meters)
Sunlight NeedsFull sun to partial shade
Blooming SeasonSummer to early fall
Flower ColorPurple-blue, white, or pink
Foliage ColorDark green
Soil RequirementsWell-draining soil, moist and fertile, pH range of 6.0 to 7.5
Invasive RegionsNot invasive

Where To Buy?

Blue Passionflower/Passiflora Caerulea, 20 Seeds – Etsy

Final Thoughts

It is clear from the reading above that there is a wide variety of flowering vines suitable for growing in the shade. And I bet you never thought that vines for shade could have so many unique flowers! So, what are you waiting for? Click on the links above to buy these fantastic plants and add color and excitement to your gardening landscape.

What are your favorite flowering vines for shade? Comment below. Also, check out our other articles:

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Scindapsus Pictus Exotica: The Fail-Proof Care, Propagation, And Watering Guide You Need

Rise And Shine: 30 Different Types Of Morning Glory Plants